Nickelodeon’s plan to build underwater theme park in Palawan opposed by environmentalists


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• Nickelodeon plans to build an underwater attraction in Palawan
• The underwater theme park would feature restaurants and lounges six meters below sea level
• Concerned people opposed the plan, saying it will destroy the marine ecosystem of Palawan

The plan of Nickelodeon, an American TV network for children, to build an underwater theme park in Palawan has been met with opposition from environmentalist groups.

The Viacom International Media Networks (VIMN), which owns Nickelodeon, announced on Monday, January 9, that it will collaborate with Coral World Parks Undersea Resorts in developing a 400-hectare underwater theme park in Coron, Palawan to give fans a chance to “interact with the brand and the iconic characters they love.”

The Deccan Chronicle said that Ron Johnson, an executive vice president with Viacom International Media Networks, said Palawan was chosen because “it is known to have some of the most beautiful beaches in the world.” The attraction would feature restaurants and lounges six meters below the sea level and is expected to open in 2020.

However, the plan is being opposed by concerned people who believe that contrary to the released press statement by VIMN that the undersea attraction “would advocate ocean protection”, it would accomplish the exact opposite.

The Save Philippine Seas, an environmental group aimed at protecting the Philippines’ marine and coastal resources, believes that the structures that will be built by the proponents will damage and disrupt Palawan’s marine ecosystem. The group launched an online petition against the planned undersea theme park.

“It is disappointing and heartbreaking that a media company for children – one I too watched growing up – is going to destroy natural resources for current and future generations Why does Coron and the Philippines need artificial attractions? Coron is already so beautiful in its natural state,” Anna Oposa, executive director of Save Philippine Seas, said.

This article has been viewed 255 times. Article originally posted: January 11, 2017, 7:18 am (UTC-0). Last update: January 11, 2017 at 7:18 am (UTC-0).

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