Viral: Bees caught swarming in Ortigas, expert explains why


Image capture from Gabz Laurel's Facebook account
  • Viral video recorded swarm of bees in Ortigas
  • Phenomenon lasted for an hour, had online community buzzing
  • Expert explained occurrence, said they were just passing by looking for a new home

MANILA, Philippines – Netizens were left abuzz after a viral video caught a huge swarm of bees flying around in Ortigas, Pasig City, on Tuesday.

The surreal scene, which took place at around 3 PM in the afternoon and was recorded by Gabz Laurel, lasted for an hour.

In an interview with GMA News, Laurel said she and her officemates were on break when they saw the bees swarming outside their building.

“Break time lang naming noong tumingin kami sa window. Nakita namin, maraming nagliliparan na insekto. Tiningnan naming tapos nang tingnan namin nang malapitan, ano siya, mga bubuyog,” she said.

[We were on break time when took a look outside the window. We saw many insects flying around. We took a closer look and when we got nearer, we found out they were bees.]

Since the time she shared it online on Facebook, Laurel’s video has garnered thousands of shares and myriads of comments ranging from the awe-struck to the tongue-in-cheek.

Some also claimed the swarm was a foreboding of a doomsday event.

Just Buzzing for a New Home

For all the talk on omens or ill-happenings however, one expert explained that the bees were house-hunting.

Dr. Cleofas Cervencia, a noted entomologist and lecturer on Insect Ecology and Pollination Biology at University of the Philippines Los Baños, said the insects were a “pre-productive swarm” simply passing by looking for a new home.

“Kasi this season, may tinatawag tayong pre-productive swarm. Dumaan lang ‘yan diyan, and then hahanap sila ng permanent na matitirahan,” she said.

[Because this season, we have what’s called a pre-productive swarm. They just passed by there, and then they will look for a permanent home.]

Video:

This article has gone viral and has been viewed 22826 times so far. Article originally posted: February 28, 2017, 11:30 pm (UTC-0). Last update: March 1, 2017 at 4:47 am (UTC-0).

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