Sieve that turns seawater into safe drinking water invented by scientists


Image from the University of Manchester
  • Graphene-based sieve that can filter salt out of seawater was invented by scientists from the UK
  • Graphene is described as the thinnest material in the world that is more than 100 times stronger than steel
  • One day, the abundant seawater could easily be turned into safe drinking water by the use of the newly invented sieve

Presently, nearly 1 billion people in the developing world have no access to clean and safe drinking water, according to The Water Project; a non-profit organization who help bring relief to communities around the world suffering from lack of access to safe drinking water.

A sieve made from Graphene recently invented by scientists from the University of Manchester in the United Kingdom could be the answer to the scarcity of safe drinking water as it could filter salt out of seawater and make it safe to drink.

Graphene is described as the thinnest material in the world (one atom thick) that is more than 100 times stronger than steel.

According to Phys.org, the graphene-oxide membrane created by the scientists has the potential to revolutionize water filtration across the world, particularly in the countries that cannot afford to put up huge desalination plants.

The use of the new technology is at present limited to the laboratory, but it showed that one day the abundant seawater could easily be made into safe drinking water.

 

This article has been viewed 153 times. Article originally posted: April 5, 2017, 2:30 am (UTC-0). Last update: April 5, 2017 at 2:30 am (UTC-0).

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