Wooden you know it: Troops get creative vs Maute, reinforce tanks and APCs with wooden planks


Image from Ozamiz AMP News' Facebook page
  • Soldiers reinforced tanks and APCS with wooden planks, ammo boxes
  • DIY blog explained how wooden armor would fare against Maute group’s anti-tank weapons

MANILA, Philippines – Filipino ingenuity at its finest.

With the Maute group still posing a significant threat after two weeks, troops in Marawi City have gone creative and placed wooden slabs and ammo boxes on their tanks and armored personnel carriers to fend off the militants’ anti-tank weapons.

Pictures of the tanks and APCs clad in wooden armor were taken and shared by GMA News journalist Raffy Tima on Twitter.

DIY blog Popular Mechanics explained how the wooden armor would fare against the anti-tank weapon the militants have been using against government forces: the RPG-2.

According to the blog Popular Mechanics, the RPG-2 is a high-explosive anti-tank (HEAT) weapon which can penetrate more than 180 millimeters of armor due to the unique shape of the warhead which compresses the forces of the explosion. As against the armor military’s V-150 APC which is designed to stop bullets with a diameter of 7.62 millimeters of less, the RPG-2 would be deadly.

The blog also mentioned two ways the wooden armor would work against the RPG-2:

In the first case, building a “cage” of wood armor would do the trick. This would cause the RPG warhead to detonate against the wood and burn through the “armor,” but dissipate before it actually reached the vehicle’s surface. If a cage isn’t available, then a lot of wood would help. At least a foot of wood armor might do the trick to dissipate the armor-piercing molten jet. Maybe.”

While the blog mentioned that wooden armor wouldn’t stand a chance against kinetic energy anti-tank rounds, it also noted that such weapons are found only in main tanks—of which the Maute group fortunately has none.

This article has been viewed 2221 times. Article originally posted: June 9, 2017, 12:06 pm (UTC-0). Last update: June 9, 2017 at 12:06 pm (UTC-0).

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