Deep-ocean wind farms could generate power that could meet the energy needs of humanity


Image from David DixonCC BY-SA 2.0
  • A study found that a deep-ocean wind farm could generate power enough to provide for all of civilization’s needs
  • Making the technology cheap enough is the challenging part, according to the researchers
  • The study said there is currently no commercial-scale deep-ocean wind farm in existence, but the technology is worth pursuing 

A study conducted by researchers from the Carnegie Institution for Science, published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the entire world could be powered by a deep-ocean wind farm in North Atlantic.

The study, according to the Seeker, could generate enough energy to provide for all of civilization’s need if only it could be built economically.

“The road might be difficult, but the prize at the end of the road is tremendous. Making these technologies cheap enough is the challenging part,” Ken Caldeira, climate researcher at the Carnegie Institution for Science in California and one of the authors of the new study, told Seeker.

Anna Possner, a postdoctoral researcher who works in Ken Caldeira’s lab at Carnegie Mellon University said, “We found that giant ocean-based wind farms are able to tap into the energy of the winds throughout much of the atmosphere, whereas wind farms onshore remain constrained by the near-surface wind resources.”

There is currently no commercial-scale deep-ocean wind farm in existence, but the technology is worth pursuing, as per the study, although the power that could be generated would vary according to the seasons.

“In the winter, North Atlantic wind farms could provide sufficient energy to meet all of civilization’s current needs. In the summer such wind farms could merely generate enough power to cover the electricity demand of Europe, or possibly the United States alone,” the study said.

 

This article has been viewed 74 times. Article originally posted: October 10, 2017, 6:31 pm (UTC-0). Last update: October 10, 2017 at 6:31 pm (UTC-0).

Facebook Comments