Japan’s first female photojournalist continues passion even at age 101

  • Japan’s 101-year-old photographer continues to take pictures
  • She was the first female photojournalist of the country
  • She has captured photos of pre and post-war Japan
  • She is working on a new collection of photographed flowers dedicated to her deceased friends

At a centennial age, Japan’s first female photojournalist remains to be as graceful, glowing and passionate as ever as she continues to do what she loves the most –– taking photos that captures the heart.

Even after breaking her arm and legs last year, Japan’s renowned photographer Tsuneko Sasamoto still does her passion and is even working on a new photo collection.

Sasamoto is currently taking pictures of flowers for her collection titled “Hana Akari (Flower Glow),” which is dedicated to her friends whom she has outlived.

Young Sasamoto Photo Credit: 90th site
Young Sasamoto
Photo Credit: 90th site

“In my own way I believe man and flowers are deeply correlated. As I think of my dear friends, I want to relate each one of them with flowers and let flowers deliver them my appreciation, impression,” Sasamoto was quoted in a Zaike News article posted October 3.

The ever youthfully-spirited photographer started her 70-year-long career in photography when she was just 25 years old. The country’s first ever female photojournalist was a brave soul capturing photos of the pre and post-war Japan.

“Pretty scared but curious, don’t like it but want to see it,” she said in a previous television interview where she spoke about her curiosity that drives her passion for the job.

“I feel compelled to face the world and let people know what I see, just want to have the pictures taken,” she added.

Her contributions were recognized when she was awarded the  16th Diamond Lady Prize (2001), the Eiji Yoshikawa Culture Prize (2011) and the 43rd Best Dresser Special Award (2014).

At age 101, Sasamoto is regarded as the oldest living photographer in the world.

“She has seen plenty of roughness, but she kept steadfast and courageous. People feel it through her work,”  an editor and close firend of the vivacious woman, Tetsuya Terashima, described Sasamoto’s photography style.

Here are some of her works collected in a Bored Panda write-up:

Geisha School, 1951 Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto
Geisha School, 1951
Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto
Hiroshima bombing aftermath, 1953 Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto
Hiroshima bombing aftermath, 1953
Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto
Antartic Ship, 1956 Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto
Antartic Ship, 1956
Photo Credit: Tsuneko Sasamoto

Loading…