NASA to provide ‘food bars’ for Orion astronauts

Image caotured through NASA's Johnson Space Center Facebook Account
  • NASA will be packing up food in bars with high calories for astronauts in the Orion capsule
  • The Orion mission must keep its mass low in order to efficiently travel beyond the moon, meaning the supplies will be limited
  • The bars are being developed in coordination with NASA’s Human Research Program, and have been tested by crew members
  • With a calorically dense bar, Orion’s mass reduction requirement will be met, the scientists said

With the limited space in the Orion capsule, NASA will be packing up food in bars with high calories for astronauts who are expected to perform several jobs in space while on a mission to the moon.

The capsule has little room inside, and the crew will have to limit the amount of food and supplies they bring, along with the garbage they create, as they will be required to carry everything back to Earth when the mission ends.

NASA said food scientists are working to develop high-calorie products that will taste good and help the astronauts keep a healthy weight.

A variety of food bars of banana nuts, orange cranberry, ginger, vanilla and barbecue, each containing 700-800 calories will be created to keep the spacemen healthy, the agency said.

According to  a NASA report, it was learned  that Astronauts have the choice of roughly 200 items for their meals while aboard on the international space station.

The astronauts will eat from thermostabilized or rehydratable packages, giving them an array of options, NASA explained.

But the Orion mission must keep its mass low in order to efficiently travel beyond the moon, meaning the supplies will be limited.

With a calorically dense bar, Orion’s mass reduction requirement will be met, the scientists said.

NASA researchers are likewise working to understand how the kind of daily meal will affect crew morale as food choice, variety, and taste influence their consumption habits.

The bars are being developed in coordination with NASA’s Human Research Program, and have been tested by crew members inside HERA, the three-story habitat at the Johnson Space Center that trains them for isolation and remote conditions.

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