Lacson expresses doubt that SC will compel Congress on joint session over martial law

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  • Senator Panfilo Lacson said the Supreme Court (SC) highly unlikely to compel the Senate and Congress to convene in joint session and deliberate on the martial law declaration in Mindanao
  • Lacson stressed there is such a thing as courtesy in the co-equal branch of government
  • The senator along with several others expressed support for President Rodrigo Duterte’s martial law declaration in Mindanao

No less than Senator Panfilo Lacson said it is highly unlikely that the Supreme Court (SC) will compel the Senate and House of Representatives to convene in joint session and deliberate on the martial law declaration in Mindanao.

In stating this, Lacson stressed there is such thing as courtesy in the co-equal branch of government, an article published by GMA News Online stated.

Earlier, the senator along with several others expressed support for President Rodrigo Duterte’s martial law declaration amid attacks by the Maute group in Marawi City.

As such, Lacson disclosed he finds it “odd” that constitutionalist Christian Monsod was one of the petitioners before the SC; further citing it was Monsod, a member of the 1986 Constitutional Commission, who argued to allow “flexibility” on the part of the President in his exercise of emergency powers.

“Nung ‘86, [sabi niya na] bigyan ng flexibility ‘yung Presidente sa pag-exercise ng emergency powers, na hayaan na lang siya sa magpatuloy sa martial law unless revoked by Congress, meaning both houses, so malinaw ‘yun,” Lacson was quoted saying.

[In 1986 he said the President should be given flexibility to exercise emergency powers and that the chief executive should be allowed to declare Martial Law unless revoked by Congress.]

Thus, he said it was clear in the minutes of the deliberations that the intention is just to convene in joint session if they are to revoke it but if they affirm then there’s no need for it.

Based on Article VII, Section 18 of the 1987 Constitution, the Congress may revoke the proclamation of martial law “voting jointly, by a vote of at least a majority of all its members in regular or special session.”

Earlier, a resolution filed by the Senate minority bloc urging a joint session was junked with a vote of 12-9 before Congress adjourned session.

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