Government pushes 60-day shutdown of Boracay businesses

Image by Crecencio I. Cruz
  • A 60-day Boracay business shutdown is being pushed by the government
  • DILG and the DENR was given six months by the President to implement the order to fully fix the island’s environmental issues

Interior Office-in-Charge Secretary Eduardo Año on Wednesday, February 28, said putting Boracay under a state of calamity would fast track the government’s effort to rehabilitate the island.

Año also said that efforts to rehabilitate Boracay could not be executed if establishments would continue to operate.

“It’s one of the options we’re considering because there is concern that the plan to rehabilitate Boracay Island cannot be achieved under normal circumstances, meaning when normal commercial activities are in operation,” he said in a statement.

According to Año, under Republic Act No. 10121 or Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (DRRM) Act of 2010, the President is authorized to declare barangays and other levels of local government units (LGUs)  under a state of calamity, upon the recommendation of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC).

This does not exempt other LGU’s with local beaches such as in El Nido in Palawan, Panglao in Bohol, and Siargao in Surigao del Norte.

Tourism Assistant Secretary Ricky Alegre said on Thursday that the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) had the idea of 60-days closure of the business of the famous tourist destination during an inter-agency meeting with the Tourism and Environment Departments on Boracay’s environmental issues.

DILG and the Department of Environmental and Natural Resources (DENR) was given six months by the President to implement immediate action to fully fix the island’s environmental issues.

DILG Assistant Secretary for Plans and Programs Epimaco V. Densing III said that the targeted 60 days shut down of business operations in Boracay during the suggested six-month state of calamity in the island would not hurt Boracay’s tourism.

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