Low sperm count can mean shorter lifespan and increased risk of illness, study finds

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  • Infertile men are likely to have important co-existing health problems or risk factors that can impair quality of life and shorten their lives
  • The new study was participated by 5,177 men in infertile couples in Italy

Man with low sperm counts are more likely to have a number of health problems and have an overall increased risk of illness.

The analysis of 5,177 men in infertile couples in Italy found that a low sperm count meant participants were 20 percent more likely to have higher body fat, blood pressure and cholesterol. These increase the risk of developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

The men were also 12 times more likely to have low testosterone levels, which reduce muscle mass and bone density and can be a precursor to osteoporosis, a condition that weakens the bones and makes them more likely to break.

“Men of couples having difficulties achieving pregnancy should be correctly diagnosed, and followed up by their fertility specialists and primary care doctor because they could have an increased chance of morbidity and mortality,” said Dr Alberto Ferlin, leader of the study, via BBC.

“Infertile men are likely to have important co-existing health problems or risk factors that can impair quality of life and shorten their lives,” he added. “Fertility evaluation gives men the unique opportunity for health assessment and disease prevention.”

The study will be presented at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society’s 100th annual meeting in Chicago.

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